Unruly patrons, careless hosts put entire hospitality sector at risk

Pubs, clubs and restaurants that flout restrictions, are putting the entire hospitality sector at risk.

The Federated Hospitality Association of South Africa (Fedhasa) is appealing to both establishments and their patrons to stick to the regulations announced by President on Monday night.

Under the new rules, the curfew will start at 11 pm and end at 4 am.

Restaurants and bars also have to close at 10 pm so that staff and patrons can get home before the curfew begins.

“The curfew is meant to prevent gatherings that go on late into the night, while enabling restaurants, bars and taverns to continue to operate and earn an income,” Ramaphosa said.

“Please be kind and patient to the waitrons, who are afraid that this second wave could mean the end of their employment. The only way we will get through this is together.”

Leandra di Carlofelice-Carcary, owner of Artisan Cafe and Tribe in Hilton.

The new regulations will also impact on the sale of alcohol from retail outlets. Bottle stores will only be permitted to operate between 10 am and 6 pm, Monday to Thursday.

Leandra di Carlofelice-Carcary, who owns Artisan Cafe and Tribe in Hilton, appealed to patrons to stick to the rules to help her and other restaurant owners to stay open as the country battles a second wave of .

“Please do not walk into our space without a mask. Please wait at the entrance to have your temperature taken, to be given sanitiser.

“Please do not come out if you have been in contact with anyone who has tested positive,” she said.

“Please be kind and patient to the waitrons, who are afraid that this second wave could mean the end of their employment. The only way we will get through this is together.”

Her comments were echoed by Rosemary Anderson, chairperson of Fedhasa, who said the tourism and hospitality sector had worked incredibly hard to institute robust health and hygiene protocols across the sector. Those who disregarded them put patrons and those they’re likely to be in contact with at risk, while also jeopardising the reputation and continued operation of the entire industry, she said.

“There can be no excuse for taking an already beleaguered industry backwards by putting at risk both livelihoods and lives because of a few hours of senseless fun,” Anderson said. She warned that establishments flouting the rules risked losing their liquor licence or being closed.

Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa, CEO of the Tourism Business Council, agreed, saying those in the hospitality sector had to implement a zero tolerance policy towards unruly people.

Meanwhile, SA’s alcohol industry has begun deploying 1 000 community safety patrollers to pubs and restaurants to mitigate the impact of alcohol-related injuries on hospitals.

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