The Rebel to Rabble Review: Calls to 'stop the great reset'; O'Toole's Scheer dilemma

With Conservative Finance critic Pierre Poilievre’s petition drive to “Stop the Great Reset” racking up more than 61,000 signatures in just two days, it’s worth noting that it was Rebel Media commander Ezra Levant who initially sounded the klaxon over the dire implications the reset in question may have for Canada.

A few days before Poilievre’s campaign went live, he tweeted a 29-second video clip of Prime Minister publicly endorsing the idea at a virtual United Nations forum on sustainable development in the COVID era earlier this fall.

“I thought this was supposed to be a conspiracy theory,” he noted.

“But here it is, straight from Trudeau’s mouth. The pandemic is the excuse for a ‘Great Reset’ of the world, led by the UN.”

(The phrase itself has been in circulation for more than a decade, but has more recently become associated with the World Economic Forum’s post-pandemic recovery initiative.)

While the video doesn’t go quite as far as Levant’s interpretation would suggest, Trudeau does indeed state that the “pandemic has provided an opportunity for a reset,” and “a chance to accelerate our pre-pandemic efforts to reimagine economic systems that actually address global challenges like extreme poverty, inequality and climate change.”

“We already knew that Trudeau was exploiting the crisis for his political ends,” Levant notes.

“But we just never knew that he thought about it in those terms, too — that he was consciously sneaking through whatever he could, as fast as he could, in the name of the pandemic.”

The real message, according to Levant: “It means globalism; it means socialism; it means open borders; it means replacing local sovereignty with supra-national organizations. It means more of the UN, and less of Canada. That’s what is all about.”

Citing the central quote from the clip — with the words “opportunity,” “reset,” “chance,” and “reimagine” in all caps — Poilievre’s petition urges Canadians to “fight back against global elites preying on the fears and desperation of people to impose their power grab,” and urges the government to “end plans to impose the ‘Great Reset,’ ” and “focus instead on protecting the lives and livelihoods of hardworking people.”

It’s worth noting that, while the petition made the front page at Post Millennial — which also offers its own argument against the reset as “incompatible with democracy,” according to columnist Spencer Fernando — it seems not to have been picked up by the Rebel Media news team just yet.

In fact, in his opening post, Levant notes that it was former prime minister Stephen Harper who originally signed Canada up for the 2030 Agenda in 2015, and he has “no reason to think (current Conservative Leader) Erin O’Toole is against it.”

That, however, was before Poilievre launched his campaign, which may be enough for Levant to rethink his assumptions about the federal Conservative party’s position on the reset.

Then again, he doesn’t seem to be particularly impressed with how O’Toole has handled the latest controversy to hit his predecessor, Andrew Scheer, after media reports revealed that Scheer had employed his sister-in-law as a staffer at his Saskatchewan constituency office, while his sister had worked in his office during his tenure as Speaker and deputy Speaker.

“He was putting his family on the payroll,” Levant summarizes. “What a sneaky little grifter.”

To add to the outrage, the story came out “right when the Conservatives had the Liberals on the ropes for one of their MPs illegally hiring her sister,” he noted.

“Except you know what? The Liberals kicked her out of the caucus. Not only did Andrew Scheer’s grifting family derail that media narrative and take the heat off the Liberals, it put O’Toole in a bind. Would he match the Liberal ethics of firing Scheer? Well, he didn’t.”

Meanwhile, Rebel correspondent-at-large Keean Bexte is — or was — hot on the trail of the U.S.-driven speculation surrounding Dominion Voting Systems, which has found itself at the epicentre of controversy and conspiracy theories that have emerged since the election.

Earlier this week, Bexte paid a visit to the company’s Toronto offices, which, he alleged, were on the same floor of the very same building as Tides Foundation, an “an extreme left eco-radical charity that directs cash supplied by George Soros to smaller groups and organizations to advance the globalist agenda of Soros.”

While he and his camera crew were eventually “removed by a building manager,” he says he learned that both companies had requested he “remove all signage and references to their shared building occupancy,” prompting him to wonder: “Why would they do that?”

He also questioned whether “the radical employees of George Soros (are) able to access the same desks, filing cabinets, servers, and Wi-Fi of Dominion Voting,” and if “any extra security protocols” have been taken “to ensure no voting data or proprietary information is protected.”

Why, he wondered, “of all the office space in the world, … has Dominion Voting occupied that office space since 2013?”

As it turns out, at least some of his questions appear to be entirely moot, according to the update since posted at the top of the story.

“After publication of this news story, Tides Canada contacted us by email,” it notes.

“They state they moved out of the office building at 215 Spadina Ave. last year, although their name remains in the building door-entry system and on the building’s directory of tenants.”

According to the update, Tides Canada also advised Rebel News “that they do not receive or disburse ‘cash’ from George Soros.”

Also trending at the Rebel this week:

  • B.C.-based Rebel correspondent Drea Humphrey stopped by another pro-Trump rally in Vancouver, “a small, but passionate (event) attended predominantly by Chinese-Canadians who are demanding transparency in the media, awareness about censorship, and who believe Canadians will benefit from Trump continuing his presidency for four more years.”
  • Toronto mission specialist David Menzies interviewed anti-mask protester Anthony Gagliardi, who may be fined at least $10,000 after he organized a “Hugs Over Masks” rally in his hometown of Hamilton. Gagliardi “plans to stage future Hugs Over Masks rallies,” as he he believes “it is his right to do so (and he) will not be deterred by the threat of potentially huge financial penalties.”
  • Finally, recent Rebel News roster add-on Andrew Chapados reassures readers that a recent federal government order for “programmable hydraulic guillotines” isn’t nearly as ominous as it sounds: “The ‘guillotines’ are actually meant for paper cutting (and) the order, intended for use by Public Services and Procurements and Statistics Canada, is simply a paper-cutting device, according to the manufacturer.”

On the progressive-left side of the Canadian activist mediasphere:

  • Ricochet contributor Christopher Curtis explores “the battle at Land Back Lane” and the “community that won’t back down” in the standoff over an unresolved land claim.
  • Rabble blogger David Climenhaga mulls over O’Toole’s recent effort to reach out to labour unions, and wonders whether it constitutes “a genuine road-to-Damascus moment for the Conservative party (or a) cynical ploy” — and, if it turns out to be the former, what risk it might pose to Canada’s traditional progressive-left parties.
  • Press Progress chronicles Conservative MP Mark Strahl’s ongoing defence of the decision by his office to “bestow a ‘community hero award’ to a local school trustee with a well-documented history of making anti-LGBTQ statements.”
  • Finally, Canadian Dimension columnist Christo Aivalis laments the fate of a New Democrat-sponsored bid to get the House of Commons to endorse a “wealth tax,” an initiative “parliamentarians united to block, (but which was) supported by a supermajority of Canadians.”

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